The MadAveGroup Blog

Wednesday, 20 November 2019 08:04

Forbes Forum: Brand - Part 3

Brand Building

My series of posts featuring answers to questions posed by the Forbes Agency Council continues. The theme of this article: brand. 

Question: A big part of growing your personal brand includes public speaking. In your experience, what’s one important element that all professionals should incorporate into their speech to make it more memorable and impactful?

Answer: If one of your goals is to build your personal brand, you'll want audience members to look for more of your thoughts after your speech, and then follow you online. So, pack your presentations with engaging content, but keep them shorter, so they feel like just a taste of what you have to offer. That can encourage people to actively seek more of your unique perspective.

Question: Just because a brand isn’t involved with a public-facing crisis doesn’t mean times aren’t tough. What’s one way for a brand to seem authentic even when the company isn’t doing particularly well?

Answer: The best way to "seem" authentic is to BE authentic. When you're always truthful and transparent, you never have to worry about coming clean if something goes wrong. If the things your brand "says" and "does" are legitimate representations of who you are as people, you're acknowledging that "we aren't for everyone," but those who identify with your message are likely to stick by you as customers.

Question: Recent grads are beginning to develop their personal brand to differentiate themselves in the competitive workforce. What’s your top tip for personal branding?

Answer: The part about a personal brand that really matters is the "personal" part. There's only one you, so don't squelch whatever passions burn inside of you. Pursue the work that matters to you, while presenting yourself in your own unique way. You may not be right for everybody, but you're going to be perfect for somebody. Maybe a lot of somebodies. And that's likely where you'll find fulfillment.

Published in The MadAve Blog
Monday, 04 November 2019 08:31

Forbes Forum: Content Creation - Part 3

Content Creation Part 3

I have an opportunity each month to answer marketing-related questions for the Forbes Agency Council. Thoughts from council members are then published at Forbes.com. This blog post is the fifth in a series featuring a few of my responses to those Forbes questions. The theme: Content Creation.

Question: It's one of the top goals of any company's marketing campaign - a strong, unique voice that unmistakably belongs to and reflects their brand and puts them top of mind with consumers. What's one way companies can create and cultivate a strong voice for their brand?

Answer: A brand's message can get watered down with marketing-speak or when trying to appeal to everyone or offend no one. If there's a leader in your company who talks in a bold, no-nonsense way about your mission and your customers, pattern your marketing content after his or her communication style. It'll likely be perceived as unique because it's so personal. It'll also ring true with your audience.

Question: Whether it's topic, venue, voice or other factors, what's your best tip for writing content that will have a long shelf life?

Answer: Yes, hot topics can attract lots of eyeballs immediately, but they can also quickly fade in relevance. If you've been doing what you do for many years, you've likely learned many valuable lessons along the way. They may be simple, foundational truths that we all need to be reminded of from time to time. As blog posts, those truths can serve both your current audience and future readers.

Question: User-generated content in the form of reviews can be one of the most powerful and effective marketing tools, but it can be hard to get happy customers to take the time to write it. What's one clever method a business can use to persuade customers to post a review?

Answer: We've worked with clients who seem almost embarrassed to ask for reviews. But when consumers are excited about a buying experience, they often want to share their opinions. So, encourage that. When someone is happy at the point of sale, ask them to share their feelings on social, a review site or with an email. Everyone wants to feel like their thoughts matter. Let your customers know theirs do.

Question: A blog can position a company or brand as an industry leader and attractive potential business partner. What's one piece of advice your client should adhere to when launching a blog to highlight their brand?

Answer: Your blog doesn't have to be about your brand directly in order to benefit your brand. If your posts are just thinly veiled ads for your company, no one will read them. So, tell stories about your customers and industry, your personal experiences, even odd topics that support your brand story. The goal of your blog should be to provide your readers with valuable insight and a unique perspective. 

Published in The MadAve Blog
Tuesday, 15 October 2019 12:29

Marketing from a Marathoner's Perspective

Chicago Marathon Start

I’m not a runner. Never have been. But for the hour that I watched last weekend’s 2019 Chicago Marathon from the streets of my daughter’s Lincoln Park neighborhood, I was completely drawn into the event.

I’d never seen anything like it: an endless stream of determined people running through a chilly Sunday morning. And most seemed in remarkably good spirits at mile 10. (I'm drained and cranky after driving ten miles.)

Later, I learned that more than 45,000 people ran the race and that 1.7 million spectators lined the route to cheer them on.

It was truly inspiring. The marathoners. Their friends and family who turned out in support. The planning and cooperation and logistics of it all. I was in awe.

Funny Chicago Marathon SignAnd yet, I had to laugh when I saw several young women holding signs that ran counter to the many messages of encouragement. One of the signs simply asked, “Why?”

“Why?” is a funny question when posed to long-distance runners, but it also made me wonder: why would a person - let alone 45,000 people - put themselves through the tremendous struggle of running a marathon?

As a non-runner, I may be going out on a limb, but I’ll suggest the “why” is at least partly about a story. Or maybe several stories.

It might be a story about other people: I’m running for my sick mom. I do it to feel closer to my late friend who was a lifelong runner. I run to raise money for people who can’t run.

It might be the story the runners tell themselves: I can do this. I can beat this. I am strong enough.

Or running marathons may be one way they define themselves: I am an athlete. I conquer obstacles. I don’t stop until the race - literal or figurative - is won.

Whether you run or not, you can likely identify with some of those feelings. Your career or your business has had to endure challenges and uphill battles, or times when you wanted to quit or thought you couldn’t make it. Maybe you even wondered “why am I doing this?”

How did you get through?

The answer to that question is a story you can tell.

In your marketing content, share what you learned about yourself or your company during those tough times. How did adversity make you lean or hone your team’s skills or help you evolve into a better partner?

In what ways did pushing through the pain give you unique insight or change your perspective?

And how can you present your story in a way that inspires your audience and allows them to appreciate you and your efforts on an entirely different level?

(Photo Credit: Top image from ChicagoMarathon.com)

RELATED POSTS: The Value of a Good Story
Tell Your Brand's Story from All Angles

Published in The MadAve Blog

The list of the 2019 MarCom Award winners includes national brands like Nationwide, AARP, Cisco, Dell, Fender and Morgan Stanley. And once again, MadAveGroup is on that list, too.

Our Caller Experience agency BusinessVoice earned four awards for their Humor On Hold.

Platinum Award: Lakeland Auto & Marine - “Previously”
Platinum Award: Binkelman - “Time Stands Still”
Gold Award: Binkelman - “All Roads”
Honorable Mention: Med-Line - HIPPA-tastic”

On its website, the MarCom Awards is described as “an international creative competition that recognizes outstanding achievement by marketing and communication professionals. Entries come from corporate marketing and communication departments, advertising agencies, public relations firms, design shops, production companies and freelancers.”

Entrants range from individual communicators to media conglomerates and Fortune 500 companies, and come from throughout the United States, Canada and dozens of other countries.

MarCom Award judges reward those entries that “exceed a high standard of excellence and serve as a benchmark for the industry.”

BusinessVoice is the world’s most-awarded provider of On Hold Marketing. Listen to the winning work in the videos below. 

 

Published in News
Wednesday, 25 September 2019 16:27

A Lunch Lesson

Customer Experience MadAveGroup

I ordered the salad.

“That comes with soup,” Mike the waiter reminded me. “Which kind would you like?”

"No soup, thanks," I said.

But even though I was having only one course, Mike took it upon himself to make my lunch more convenient.

“I’ll bring you a large bowl of salad so you can help yourself to as much as you’d like.”

He also brought three cups of dressing. Then, as I was finishing up, he asked if he could bring me an iced tea refill in a to-go cup.

Those may seem like small gestures, but I can’t recall a restaurant server offering them before.

Oh, and he was friendly and energetic, too.

Mike’s primary job was to take my order and bring food to the table, but within that limited scope of opportunity, he got creative. He anticipated my needs, applied some empathy, used the tools he had - salad, bowls and a disposable cup - and created a memorable encounter.

Perfect.

When I complimented him on his great work, Mike thanked me and told me he believes in the Golden Rule and the power of Karma. But I already knew that about him.

Now, try to tell yourself you can’t make the same type of effort for the people who keep your company in business.

Try to buy into the idea you don’t have the time to make a better impression or add value, that you don’t have the resources, or the job title, or any good ideas.

Try to swallow the notion that extra effort and care don't matter, that they're not a defining difference between the brands people love and those that disappear.

Go ahead. Try.

Published in The MadAve Blog

Advertising Copywriting

As you browse online content, read ads, and listen to TV and radio commercials, you’ll see or hear lots of worthless words - advertising phrases and clichés that add no value, provide no clarity and, sometimes, don’t even make sense.

It’s fluff that steals the audience’s time and weakens the brand’s message.

Those worthless words are there for at least one of three reasons:

1) An inexperienced copywriter

2) The company’s lack of vision for their advertising, and/or

3) Laziness

Your audience’s perception of your brand is too important to squander any opportunities to promote it. So, if you write or contribute ideas to your company’s advertising content, keep these basic ideas in mind.

Your audience’s time is valuable. When you waste it, they’ll be less likely to give it to you in the future. Say as much as you can in as few words as possible.

Use advertising content to guide your audience. People want help with making good buying decisions. Ideally, your ad copy will show them a logical, legitimate path from their need or problem to your solution.

Give your audience something in return for their attention. It might be useful facts or a serious question to ponder. Or maybe it’s just a good laugh. The bottom line: leave them glad they invested their time in your message.

 

Examples of Content to Avoid

I once heard a used car dealer wrap up his on-camera pitch by saying, “We accept cash.” Are there businesses that refuse cash? In other words, that line isn’t necessary. The following phrases aren’t either.

“We’re conveniently located.” Convenience is relative. A store that’s convenient for one audience member may be completely out of the way for others.

The takeaway: Don’t make blanket statements.

“Your call is important to us.” That’s a set-up to a now-common joke. The punchline: “If my call is so important, pick up the damn phone.”

The takeaway: Delete clichés and other “expected” phrases that only serve as filler. Replace them with information your audience can apply.

“Summer’s here, so it’s time to…” I promise that everyone who reads or hears your copy knows which season it is, or that Christmas is near, or that it’s back-to-school time.

The takeaway: Don’t waste time stating the obvious. It can be insulting to your audience and it draws focus away from your main points.

“We’re dedicated to your satisfaction.” At best, baseless platitudes do nothing to separate you from other brands that rely on the same tactic. At worst, you’ll be perceived as a company that exaggerates or even lies.

The takeaway: Unless you can prove your dedication or somehow guarantee you offer the best service, avoid those types of lofty claims.

Those are just a few examples of specific phrases that weaken advertising copy, but there are others. So, be diligent in your copy editing, filtering your content through these questions:

  • Is this copy honest and accurate?
  • Which words can I delete without watering down the message?
  • Does this copy address a need my potential customers have or is it all self-serving?
  • Is this writing clear enough to convey the unique value our company provides?

It takes time and effort to write and re-write impactful advertising copy that’s also a pleasure to read or hear, but the trust and interest that quality content creates is worth the work; it will serve as the foundation of a powerful voice for your brand.

Published in The MadAve Blog

Customer Experience 1I received a testimonial yesterday.

That's not unusual. We're fortunate to receive hundreds each year.

But this testimonial was special.

It wasn’t from a client, partner, prospect or vendor. In fact, it wasn’t from someone we’ve ever worked with.

It was from a man who called us by mistake. That’s right: a wrong number.

But, it turns out, he had such a positive experience with the person who answered our phone that he was compelled to let me know about it. He wrote the following.

“I actually called by accident. Your number is one digit different from another company I was reaching out to. But, when I got off the line with Courtney, I went to your website and read the intro about the importance of making a positive impact during EVERY interaction. It very much hit home because I’d just had that experience with Courtney. It’s been three hours and I still feel the positive vibe she puts out. I want to commend your organization and her sincerely. Nice, genuine people seem to be in short supply these days.”

His email made me smile with gratitude.

As CEO of MadAveGroup, one of my primary responsibilities is to “protect our culture.” And nothing has a greater effect on that culture than the people we employ and our commitment to creating positive customer experiences.

Pull Quote 4ABuilding that type of environment doesn't happen by accident. Ideally, it's organic and begins with an authentic desire to serve people, but it must always be encouraged and nurtured.

It can be grown, too. For instance, you can use ongoing training to teach employees how to actively create positive experiences for your customers.

Do you provide the tools or incentives to create great interactions? Do your team members know they have the power to make things right with angry customers on the spot? Do you talk about proactively looking for opportunities to wow your clients?

And most importantly, do you follow specific hiring procedures that improve the chances of your new recruits fitting into your positive experience culture?

How would your customers describe their experiences with your organization?

The success of your company depends on their answers.

Published in The CEO's Blog
Thursday, 21 June 2018 15:41

MadAveGroup Video Wins 2018 Telly Award

MadAveGroup has earned a 2018 Silver Telly Award in the category of Branded Content / General - Promotional.

Since 1979, The Telly Awards has recognized creativity and effectiveness in video content and production. The competition attracts more than 12,000 entries annually from all 50 states and five continents. 

Our winning video (below) is a darker but humorous self-promotional piece that stresses the importance of providing a great customer experience at every touchpoint. 

Production credits:
Jason Crockett - Videographer / Editor
Terry Lesniewicz - Director of Photography
Chris Zaharias - Audio Post-Production
Greg Stawicki - Graphics
April Cochran - Production Assistant
Scott Greggory - Writer / Director  

Published in News
Monday, 03 December 2018 08:41

5 Lessons You Can Learn from Santa Claus

5 Lessons to Learn from SantaOver the years, Santa has set a pretty high standard. Consider a few of the things the big guy does and you’ll discover some takeaways that you can apply to your company.

1) Communicate the way your customers prefer - Reading letters hand-written in crayon may not appeal to many people over age 9, but Santa does it because he knows it’s important to his customers. How can you make it easier and more enjoyable for potential buyers to reach you?

• Add a live chat feature to your website?
• Increase call center staff to assist customers quicker or permit deeper conversations?
• Provide callers in queue with a call-back option?
• Make texting available to your customers?

2) Be predictably reliable - Santa delivers right on time. In fact, that’s what blows everyone’s mind about the guy. Despite an ever-growing customer base and the skyrocketing cost of reindeer chow, he comes through like clockwork every December 25th. Could you wow your clients by shortening turnaround times?

• Which production and delivery-related processes can you re-evaluate and tighten up?
• Would new partnerships allow you to provide quicker or more consistent delivery?

3) Embrace your weirdness - A red suit? That floppy lid? The belt on steroids? I mean, Santa wears some crazy threads, no doubt, but he makes ‘em work. The look is so his that no one can even think about swiping it. Have faith in what makes you unique, whether it’s your culture, your marketing philosophies or your branding. When those ideas are genuine and deeply held, they can distinguish you in the marketplace and as an employer.

4) Explore new distribution channels - Santa’s got the chimney thing cornered, but you know that when he first started sliding into fireplaces his friends were like, “You get into houses how?” Don’t be afraid to look into new or unconventional ways you can get your product to market.

• Can you partner with a complementary company, just as Wendy’s teamed with DoorDash and Uber Eats to get their food into more mouths?
• Are there less obvious connections you can make, such as when an animal rescue shelter placed their doggies in the lobby of an Asheville, North Carolina hotel? (Read the story.)

5) Do one thing and kill it - Nobody’s better at the gift game than Santa. The dude’s in a league of his own. Yet, he hasn’t over-extended his brand to jump on that Easter action or move into the birthday market. Yes, he works just one slice of the present pie, but he owns that slice.

• Are you providing so many services that you haven’t been able to master any of them? If so, consider how that may affect your brand and your ability to justifiably charge the higher price of an expert.
• How might you customize your product in a way that can be legally protected and allow you to claim its unique property as exclusive?

Published in The MadAve Blog

WebArt Digital MarketingDigital marketing is a fast-paced, ever-changing discipline, so you may find it comforting that there are people who keep up with it every day. The experts at WebArt, our digital marketing agency, are those people.

Here are links to a few of their recent blog posts we think you’ll find valuable.

1) In his article “To Growth Hack or Not to Growth Hack,” Director of Digital Marketing Brad Timofeev writes about a practice that many large companies have employed to attract users to their products or services. But it’s not right for every company. Find out why

2) Making sure that Google and Bing have your company’s correct contact information is crucial to your online success. If they don’t - and you’re not a WebArt client - you’ll need to reach out to the search engines yourself to have the info updated. That can be a frustrating process, according to WebArt PPC Analytics Specialist Jake Patterson. Read his post, “How to Work with Support Teams at Google and Bing Over the Phone.”

3) One of the recurring themes in our posts is the idea of keeping marketing content concise. A few examples: “Less Is More” from the BusinessVoice Blog and “Too Much Information” from the MadAveGroup Blog. Now, WebArt Content Developer Joel Sensenig takes on the topic with his post “Content: Why Shorter is Sweeter.”

Want better results from your digital marketing? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call him at 419/724-7343.

Published in The MadAve Blog
Page 1 of 3