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Apollo Astronauts

Fifty years ago, a dedicated team of people made history, changing our perception of what was possible by landing two men on the moon and returning them safely to Earth.

If you weren’t alive in July of 1969 or you were too young to remember the Apollo 11 mission, it might be easy to minimize their accomplishment given all our technological advances in the decades since.

But at the core of their commitment to reach the moon was that human quality that’s so often present at the leading edge of innovation - courage.

In September 1962, when President Kennedy urged American citizens to support a lunar mission, NASA was not prepared to deliver a solution, yet they accepted the challenge.

Everyone involved understood that preparing for the expedition would be physically and mentally demanding, so they persevered.

The astronauts assumed they had only a 50/50 chance of surviving the flight, but still, they sat atop hundreds of thousands of gallons of explosive rocket fuel willingly.

And as a result of all that courageous focus, the work of the Apollo 11 team stands among the greatest achievements in human history.

In your work, can you summon the courage to chart new frontiers? They don’t need to be as daunting as space travel. But, whether you own a small shop, spend your nights developing new software, or lead a team of medical professionals each day, you can dare to dream.

Then, set to making it real.

Will it be hard? Probably.

Will it matter? Certainly.

Remember, walking on the moon began as nothing more than an idea, too.

As you look to the night sky on this important anniversary - and forevermore - let it inspire you to wonder what’s possible. And let it remind you that courage can make it so. 

Wow Customers

Michael, one of our agency directors, drove across town to pick up lunch for the 15 people in our office. (The rest of the staff were on a company-sponsored trip.)

When he got back, he realized that one of the large foil trays of food had been mislabeled. Instead of the peach cobbler he ordered he was given green beans.

Hardly a tragedy, but Michael called the restaurant to see how they might correct their mistake. “Just come back and pick up the cobbler,” the manager suggested. But the restaurant was 20 minutes away, so Michael would have to make another 40-minute roundtrip just to get what he ordered.

Michael asked if the manager could send a driver to our offices with the cobbler. “No,” came the reply.

“But you cater, and I saw two of your company vans in your parking lot,” Michael reasoned.

“Can’t do it,” said the manager.

Guess who will never make another $260 purchase at that restaurant.

Rather than seizing the opportunity to be a customer service hero - by correcting a mistake his team made, no less - the manager chose the easy, short-sighted approach. No suggestion of any options. No offer of a free meal or future discount. Not even an apology.

Imagine how quickly any bad feelings could have been prevented with a heartfelt “I’m so sorry about that” from the manager.

We’ve said it before in this blog: no one expects perfection from your company. Screw-ups are going to happen now and then. But not owning up to those mistakes and making them right will cost you brand damage and buyers.

Can’t fix the problem right away? Then offer a sincere apology on the spot and let your customer know you’ll contact her within a specific amount of time with a few options. Then, let her choose which make-good she wants.

Even the best advertising can’t compensate for a lack of customer care or a staff that’s not empowered to make things right when they go wrong. Every encounter - EVERY encounter - is a chance to wow people and create a business that's worthy of customer loyalty.

RELATED POSTS: That Time Amazon Saved a Wedding
Everyday Effort: The Source of Great Customer Service
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InspirationIf you think you can’t draw inspiration from younger people, I urge you to reconsider that notion.

I spent a recent Saturday morning with several graphic design students from Bowling Green State University. The occasion was the Graphic Design Department’s Portfolio Review, a chance for juniors and seniors to network with advertising professionals and get feedback on their work. 

I met several talented designers, but two stood out. One showcased work that was born of her personal passion - the protection of coral reefs around the world; the other created from his personal pain - the loss of his parents earlier in the year.

Both projects were thoughtful and beautifully executed, but it was the inspiration and the story behind each one that allowed the messages to resonate. Each designer followed his or her heart and worked sincerely with the goal of helping others. I was truly moved by the obvious care they had invested.

What about you?

Are you doing work that matters to you? Are you leading your team, your department or your entire company to change the world - or your small corner of it - for the better?

If your workplace isn’t fertile ground for that sort of thought, how can you invest your personal time in a way that feeds your need to serve others?

It’s easy to slip into auto-pilot. It’s easy to lose sight of the professional vision you had long ago. But it’s just as easy to re-commit to making a difference with your life and your work.

So, what matters to you?

The Charleston StoryIn early April, my family and I spent a week in Charleston, South Carolina.

We love the city. And we’re not alone. Charleston welcomes about 7 million visitors each year. Tourism supports nearly 50,000 jobs and is worth about $7.5 billion annually to the “lowcountry” town. Travelers have even voted it America’s number one city for many consecutive years.

And what’s at least one reason for that?

Founded in 1670, Charleston is still filled with a stunning array of historical homes, churches and other magnificent buildings, including The Old Exchange, where President George Washington was once honored with a lavish ball.

That history is palpable throughout the city. And even if you aren’t aware of any of the specific historical details, the architecture alone serves as a constant reminder of how special and significant the town is.

In other words, Charleston is proof that people are drawn to a good story.

Your company may not be able to boast that America’s first president danced in your conference room, or that the initial shots of the Civil War were fired from your lobby, but it’s likely that you have a compelling story of your own to tell. Maybe it’s developed as your business has grown, or maybe it’s been part of you all along.

Your story could be about what motivates you to do what you do.

It could center around the care and attention to detail you invest while making your product.

Maybe your story is about the people you choose to hire, your unusual culture, or how you direct profits to serve the less fortunate.

Or, like Charleston’s, your story might be rooted in your unique heritage.

If you’re not already telling that story, think about what it could be and all the channels you can use to share it with your audience.

Tuesday, 29 January 2019 13:59

Don't Hide the Facts

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Truth in AdvertisingThe other day I heard a lightning-quick disclaimer at the end of a radio spot. The voiceover was so fast and mixed at such a low volume that I couldn’t begin to understand it. 

And that’s the point. 

That advertiser didn’t want me - or anyone else - to hear those details. 

My immediate response to that tactic is “what are they trying to hide?” And, just as quickly, any trust I may have had in the advertiser evaporates. 

Even if you don’t use radio or TV to advertise, are you purposely hiding valuable or even necessary information from consumers in other channels? 

Maybe it’s that fine print on a sales form. Or contact information that’s buried deep within your website. Or details about the restrictions on a warranty. 

Ask yourself if discovering that information after the sale would anger your customers, or cause them to lose faith in you, or lessen their willingness to buy from you again. 

Then ask, “As a consumer, would I want easy access to that information?” 

If your buyers knew about that hidden information, might it jeopardize sales? Maybe. But are you willing to exchange a quick sale for disappointed customers who’ve lost trust in your brand?

Shop SignThis morning - December 28th - I went to the shop of a service provider I use several times each year.

I walked right by the sign that said they’d be closed for the holidays until January 2nd and then tried to open the locked door.

Lucky for me, the owner happened to be in the building. She unlocked the door, welcomed me in, and graciously took care of me, despite the even bigger lobby sign that clearly listed the shop’s holiday schedule.

I didn’t see that sign either - until she made a joke about it.

I felt like a dope for missing the signs and for inconveniencing her, but the experience served as a reminder of two important points:

1) The world is not actively looking for your message on a sign, on a website, or in any other marketing channel. That seems to be doubly true when your message is (even temporarily) different from what your audience expects.

2) Consumer habit runs deep and, as marketers, we all need to work consistently and creatively if we wish to change or side-step certain behaviors.

When developing a strategy and deciding how your message will be presented, think like a consumer whose top priority is his or her own needs. That should be easy because that’s what you are. That’s what we all are! But when we’re crafting content for our own businesses, we tend to forget that. Suddenly, we believe that everyone actively thinks about our company or store.

They don’t. Not even your best customers.

Consider These Points

  • Always make your message as simple to see and digest as possible. Use concise copy. And choose logical images that support that copy, not draw attention from it.

  • Consider where you place your message. Will it be easy for your intended audience to see or hear when they need to see or hear it? Different people prefer to consume information in different ways, so use several channels to distribute your announcement.

  • Does your message attract attention? Remember, your potential audience is probably not actively looking for the information you’re sharing, so design your message to interrupt the habit in which they’re currently engaged, whether that's buying a competitor’s product, making assumptions about what you do or don’t sell, or, yes, even trying to walk into your shop when it’s closed for the holidays.

RELATED POSTS: Too Much Information
Would You Read This?

Wednesday, 19 December 2018 19:31

Using Your Limitations

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Using Your LimitationsNecessity is the mother of invention.

In other words, when you absolutely require an idea or a solution, you’ll work with what you have to come up with what you need.

You likely face limits with your work, maybe even several times per day: a small budget, older technology, an inexperienced team, not nearly enough time.

But the good news is that embracing those negatives can lead you down a creative path you may not have considered and, possibly, to better, more interesting results.

Story 1

During my teen years, I was a skilled letterer. I could draw block letters by hand, properly kerned, straight across the page, all within the allotted horizontal space. But, as I got older, I was no longer satisfied with my level of precision. I couldn’t make the letters “perfect enough.” So, I started drawing them inconsistently on purpose, in different sizes, each with their own twists. The work became much less predictable and far more interesting. I still use that freeform style today.

Story 2

In my spare time, I run a website and Facebook page for a friend who owns an antique store. I shoot all the pictures that I post. But there’s not a lot of elbow room in the shop, and sunshine doesn’t fall into every corner. So, I’ve adapted my photo style to accommodate the tight spaces and lower light. In the shop, I’m forced to stay closer to the piece I’m shooting, and often need to present it at a 45-degree angle or from above. But, the proximity lets me capture the object’s subtle features, the texture and patina, even a sense of its age - details I might not communicate if I weren’t forced into that different shooting style.

In both cases, I've harnessed negatives - whether it’s my own limitation or how my environment limits me. And in both cases, I believe the work is better because of that adaptation.

The Takeaway

Ironically, too many options or too much freedom can be crippling, while working with fewer resources can kickstart your creativity by forcing you to think in different ways.

So, the next time you don’t have all the elements you think you need, use the fact that something is missing to take your work in a new direction. Or, when you DO have all the pieces but there’s still no magic happening, start taking pieces away to encourage yourself to think differently.

In his TED Talk called “Embrace the Shake,” artist Phil Hansen presents many examples of why you should “seize the limitations." It’ll be the most inspiring 10 minutes of your day. Check it out.

5 Lessons to Learn from SantaOver the years, Santa has set a pretty high standard. Consider a few of the things the big guy does and you’ll discover some takeaways that you can apply to your company.

1) Communicate the way your customers prefer - Reading letters hand-written in crayon may not appeal to many people over age 9, but Santa does it because he knows it’s important to his customers. How can you make it easier and more enjoyable for potential buyers to reach you?

• Add a live chat feature to your website?
• Increase call center staff to assist customers quicker or permit deeper conversations?
• Provide callers in queue with a call-back option?
• Make texting available to your customers?

2) Be predictably reliable - Santa delivers right on time. In fact, that’s what blows everyone’s mind about the guy. Despite an ever-growing customer base and the skyrocketing cost of reindeer chow, he comes through like clockwork every December 25th. Could you wow your clients by shortening turnaround times?

• Which production and delivery-related processes can you re-evaluate and tighten up?
• Would new partnerships allow you to provide quicker or more consistent delivery?

3) Embrace your weirdness - A red suit? That floppy lid? The belt on steroids? I mean, Santa wears some crazy threads, no doubt, but he makes ‘em work. The look is so his that no one can even think about swiping it. Have faith in what makes you unique, whether it’s your culture, your marketing philosophies or your branding. When those ideas are genuine and deeply held, they can distinguish you in the marketplace and as an employer.

4) Explore new distribution channels - Santa’s got the chimney thing cornered, but you know that when he first started sliding into fireplaces his friends were like, “You get into houses how?” Don’t be afraid to look into new or unconventional ways you can get your product to market.

• Can you partner with a complementary company, just as Wendy’s teamed with DoorDash and Uber Eats to get their food into more mouths?
• Are there less obvious connections you can make, such as when an animal rescue shelter placed their doggies in the lobby of an Asheville, North Carolina hotel? (Read the story.)

5) Do one thing and kill it - Nobody’s better at the gift game than Santa. The dude’s in a league of his own. Yet, he hasn’t over-extended his brand to jump on that Easter action or move into the birthday market. Yes, he works just one slice of the present pie, but he owns that slice.

• Are you providing so many services that you haven’t been able to master any of them? If so, consider how that may affect your brand and your ability to justifiably charge the higher price of an expert.
• How might you customize your product in a way that can be legally protected and allow you to claim its unique property as exclusive?

WebArt Digital MarketingDigital marketing is a fast-paced, ever-changing discipline, so you may find it comforting that there are people who keep up with it every day. The experts at WebArt, our digital marketing agency, are those people.

Here are links to a few of their recent blog posts we think you’ll find valuable.

1) In his article “To Growth Hack or Not to Growth Hack,” Director of Digital Marketing Brad Timofeev writes about a practice that many large companies have employed to attract users to their products or services. But it’s not right for every company. Find out why

2) Making sure that Google and Bing have your company’s correct contact information is crucial to your online success. If they don’t - and you’re not a WebArt client - you’ll need to reach out to the search engines yourself to have the info updated. That can be a frustrating process, according to WebArt PPC Analytics Specialist Jake Patterson. Read his post, “How to Work with Support Teams at Google and Bing Over the Phone.”

3) One of the recurring themes in our posts is the idea of keeping marketing content concise. A few examples: “Less Is More” from the BusinessVoice Blog and “Too Much Information” from the MadAveGroup Blog. Now, WebArt Content Developer Joel Sensenig takes on the topic with his post “Content: Why Shorter is Sweeter.”

Want better results from your digital marketing? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call him at 419/724-7343.

Content Creation 2As a member of the Forbes Agency Council, I provide answers to several of the group’s marketing-related questions each month. That input is then considered for publication at Forbes.com. Our MadAveGroup blog series based on the Forbes questions continues with part 2 of my thoughts on content creation.

Question: Content is a great way to position yourself and your brand as a thought leader in your space. What’s your best tip for creating content ideas that differentiate your company website from your competitors’?

Answer: Trying to conceive all your brand's online content yourself can be stressful and may prove ineffective. So, tap into your staff's knowledge. Your frontline employees will provide a unique perspective on your buyers' concerns. And those in sales or production face challenges that may lead to valuable insight. Look at what your company does from many angles to create rich, authentic content.

Question: Podcasts have become a popular medium for both publishers and brands. What's your best tip for business professionals who are thinking about starting a podcast?

Answer: If your podcast purports to teach or provide some type of insight, get to the point quickly. Dispense with the "how was your weekend?" chit-chat and deliver on your promise. As with so many other cases, it's about respecting your audience's time and giving them what they came for. Once you earn a reputation for crafting concise content of great value, your podcast is more likely to succeed.

Question: My company is planning to launch a blog. What's one best practice you could offer me?

Answer: Yes, blog posts typically consist of one person's thoughts, but if writing isn't your strength, run your words past a skilled copy editor before publishing. If the blog is an extension of your brand, you don't want potential customers disregarding your product or service because of what your muddy content or careless mistakes may say about your attention to detail.

Question: When done right, press releases can be extremely beneficial for a business. On the flip side, what’s one glaring mistake you see time and again with press releases?

Answer: Your new product or event is a big deal to you, but it likely doesn't qualify as worthy of a media outlet's time or space - unless you can highlight its broader appeal or importance to the newspaper or TV station's audience. Editors and news directors need to be able to justify what they publish as valuable to their audiences. Prove your story's value and it'll stand a better chance of being seen.

RELATED POSTS: Marketing Copy: Let's Be Clear
4 Keys to Great Advertising

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