The MadAveGroup Blog

Scott Greggory, Chief Creative Officer

"It's all about creating marketing content that people WANT to hear, even when it's in a traditionally negative environment."

That's how Chief Creative Officer Scott Greggory describes Humor On Hold, the unique service provided by BusinessVoice, our Caller Experience Marketing agency.

"Nobody wants to be put on hold after calling a company, but if we can make the experience surprisingly funny, while still imparting useful information, both the caller and our client win."

And, once again, BusinessVoice has been named a winner for creative excellence. The agency received two honors during the 2022 MARCE Awards ceremony, presented September 19th by The Experience Marketing Association (EMA).

Our Humor On Hold for Wellington Implement earned the trophy for the Most Entertaining On Hold Marketing production, as well as a Judge's Choice award.

One judge wrote that "This is very entertaining. The situations really enhance the brand." Another judge noted that our work "made me want to listen to the next message all the way through."

Creative Consultant Daniel DiManna and Scott Greggory co-wrote the copy. Josh Jump served as recording engineer.

If you're considering a new approach with your marketing content, talk with our team about using humor in your videos, website, social channels and On Hold Marketing.

Thursday, 01 September 2022 20:27

8 Reminders: Marketing and Communication Basics

Marketing and Communication Basics

Yep. The following reminders are, in fact, basic. But there’s a good reason to read the list - the “basics” are foundational.

Even the most accomplished musicians warm up by playing scales. Even the best hitters in the Major Leagues take batting practice before each game.

Likewise, reviewing and applying these basic thoughts can help you maintain your strong foundation.

Here we go…

1) On your business cards, résumé and email signature, use the name you want people to call you. If you prefer Bob, don’t refer to yourself as Robert on your LinkedIn page and other public profiles.

2) Make your emails easier to scan and read by using bullet points. Change important ideas from black to red. And highlight any requests that require action.

3) Include all your company’s contact information on your website. Don’t just make potential customers enter their personal info, submit it and then wait for your response.

4) Writing a blog post or a longer email? Start with an outline. Jot down the main points you’d like to make in a column. Add basic details under each point. Then, build your content around those points. Move your blocks of content as necessary to create the most logical flow for your audience.

Also, when writing website and email copy, apply this journalism principle: don’t bury the lede. Position the most important information near the top of your content.

5) In a meeting? Keep your phone or other device out of sight. Turning it over isn’t good enough. The presence of your phone or tablet suggests to others in the room that, at any second, you could be attending to an email or call that's “more important."

6) Never lie - or even exaggerate - with your marketing. Making outrageous claims about your product is an obvious type of lying, but there are more subtle misrepresentations, too. For example, the marketing emails that include this type of copy:

“I’ve been reviewing your website, MadAveGroup.com. I really like it, and I’ve been thinking about ways that we could help you generate even more traffic.”

The person who sent that email didn’t review our site. He didn’t form an opinion of our site. And, on a whim, he didn’t start pondering ways to improve our site. Lies have no place in any type of relationship. Make sure your marketing messages are accurate and honest.

7) Edit your business writing so it’s as concise, yet as effective as possible. Cut the fluff and repetition to show respect for your audience’s time. Whether you’re crafting emails, reports or blog posts, it’s your job as the writer to make your content easy to navigate, digest and retain.

8) Always say “thank you.” For a client’s time or trust. For a customer’s purchase. For a colleague’s insight. Thank people when they hold the door, when they pick up the tab, when they do good work. Look people in the eyes, say thank you as often as you can and mean it. There’s neither an easier expression of gratitude nor one that’s more meaningful.

Thank you for reading.

RELATED POSTS: Is Everything Fine?
Forbes Forum: Content Creation - Part 4
Are There 'Worthless' Words in Your Advertising Copy?  

Tuesday, 09 August 2022 12:48

"Picture Toledo!" Photo Challenge

We asked a few of our staff members to step outside of their normal skill sets for a while and capture images of our hometown of Toledo, Ohio. 

Check out their photos below.

Want to live in our great city and work at MadAveGroup? Find details here.

 

Bob Seybold

Bob1

Bob2

Bob3

Bob4

 

Lindsay Gebhart

Lindsay1

Lindsay2

 

Kara Koepfer

Kara1

Kara2

 

Daniel DiManna

Daniel2

Daniel1

 

Scott Greggory

Scott11

Scott1

Scott8

Scott4

Scott7

Scott5

Scott3

Scott13

Scott2

Scott9

Scott6

Scott12 

If Your Brand Is Flawed Do What Bob Fosse Did

Bob Fosse was one of the world’s best-known choreographers. Over his 40-year career, he designed memorable dance scenes for films and Broadway musicals, including All That Jazz, Cabaret, Pippin and Chicago. (Watch a salute to Fosse here.)

He earned an Oscar, three Emmys and nine Tony Awards, while creating a dark, sensual, instantly recognizable look and a unique physical vocabulary that still inspire dancers decades after his death.

Yet, much of his signature approach was born of his weaknesses.

In a 1984 BBC interview, Fosse said, “Truly, my style came from my own physical problems. I always had a slight hunch in my shoulders, so, as a dancer, I began hunching.”

He started losing his hair as a young man, “so I started wearing a lot of hats.”

“And I never had the ballet turn-out, so I said, ‘well, I can’t turn [my feet] out, so I’m going to do the opposite and turn them in.’ The whole style has come out of my defects.”

Fosse said, “I thank God I wasn’t born perfect.”

Of course, nobody is perfect. Nor is any brand. But, while you’re walking the endless path to improvement, consider how you could capitalize on your company's weaknesses.

Start by re-positioning what you perceive as negatives. Instead, think of them as quirks, unique qualities that could have value as differentiators. No one saw Bob Fosse’s hunched shoulders or thinning hair as impairments because he leaned into them. He looked right through the cons and saw the pros on the other side. Then, he put those features to work for his dancers.

So, for example, is your company smaller than you’d like it to be?

Instead of going into debt to grow your local inventory, focus on just one product and work to earn your status as a respected national expert on that item.

Instead of hiring more people, invest in training the staff you already have so that they come to exemplify a new pinnacle of customer service.

Instead of upgrading to technical systems you can’t afford, embrace old-school business practices: personal phone calls, face-to-face meetings, hand-written thank you notes.

Each of those is an example of looking at a perceived problem through Fosse-like eyes. And each could elevate you and your brand in the hearts and minds of customers. 

RELATED POSTS: A Lunch Lesson
What You Can Learn from Norm Macdonald
Using Your Limitations

Tuesday, 21 June 2022 14:05

Look for Indicators

Look for Indicators

I drove behind a pick-up truck for a few miles the other day. On the truck’s rear window was a hard-to-read, dated, ultra-fancy logo for a local florist. My immediate thought was, “I’d never call that place for flowers.”

Why? Because of how poorly they presented their information, even though they're in the presentation business

Whether the florist designed or just approved the gaudy logo, I assumed they’d also do a bad job of designing tasteful floral arrangements or, at the very least, that their idea of what’s beautiful is not consistent with mine.

To me, that florist’s logo was an indicator. And often, indicators speak louder and more truthfully about a company’s abilities and commitment than its advertising and marketing content do. For instance…

  • Is the restaurant’s front window filthy? If so, you don’t want to see their kitchen.
  • Is the wireless provider’s website an endless maze? There’s a good chance their customer service feels like that, too.
  • Is the physician’s office always short-staffed? That suggests that the doctor who cares for your health doesn’t know how to care for his employees.

Indicators are red flags that may provide insight into future encounters. A company’s commercials or online ads might allude to a great buying experience, but when its callers are kept on hold in silence or their store environments are old and tired or the staff isn’t trained and friendly, customers are sure to be disappointed with what they find in real life.

Distinctive, memorable advertising and marketing content is important, but it must also be an accurate representation of what you deliver. Exaggeration for the sake of bringing people through the virtual or actual door can quickly backfire in the form of bad reviews and angry customers.

On the other hand, you may be the best landscape architect in town, but if the lawn and bushes in front of your office are brown and crispy, potential clients might be suspicious of your good reputation.

As a consumer, it’s important to look for indicators before you buy. As a marketer, it’s even more important to recognize when your message or visual brand is misleading, inaccurate or potentially damaging in any other way.

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Are There "Worthless" Words in Your Advertising Copy?
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Monday, 13 June 2022 11:38

MadAveGroup Wins 2022 Telly Award

In June 2022, MadAveGroup won a Telly Award for "Hang The Wreath," a holiday-themed television campaign we produced to subtly promote our agency.

"We purchased air time on a local TV station, but, as a B-to-B company, we knew the majority of the audience wouldn't need our services," said Chief Creative Officer Scott Greggory. "So, we chose to have a little fun with the concept."

The three 15-second spots pushed viewers to the HangTheWreath.com website where they could read about the cast of the commercials, download a screensaver and vote for the destination of a holiday wreath.

"We targeted the spots at local marketers to draw them to the site and learn what it was all about," said Greggory.

The Telly Awards honor the best work created for television and other video channels. Each year, industry judges review more than 12,000 entries from every state and five continents.

Watch the winning campaign below.
 

Telly Awards Graphic

Our BusinessVoice team won a 2022 Communicator Award of Excellence for a Humor On Hold production created for Lakeland Auto and Marine in Port Clinton, Ohio. The audio, captured in the video below, is titled “What’s This Sound?”

Communicator Award entries are judged by members of the Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts. The panel consists of professionals from media, communications, advertising, creative and marketing firms. Members represent major organizations, including Amazon, Conde Nast, Disney, ESPN, GE Digital, Spotify, The Wall Street Journal and Wired.

Credits:

Scott Greggory - Writer / Voiceover
Chris Zaharias - Recording Engineer
Amy Scott - Voiceover

 

Monday, 02 May 2022 11:03

What is Your Marketing Philosophy?

What Is Your Marketing Philosophy

As a marketer, what do you believe in?

What's the philosophy that guides or differentiates your work?

Those questions may seem challenging at first, but they're worth considering, since you could easily apply the answers to what you do every day going forward. Whether it’s one simple statement or a few basic rules you commit to, a personal marketing philosophy can be a handy tool.

As an example, these are my three philosophies:

1) Always ask the question “who cares?” about anything I write. (Is the target audience likely to find value in my copy or content?)

2) Express ideas as concisely as possible. (Respect the audience's time.)

3) When appropriate - and sometimes when it's not - use humor. (Work to give the audience the memorable gift of unexpected laughter.)

If you're a writer or another type of creative, your philosophy can hone your creation and editing processes. Let it serve as your standard or a “filter” through which you run marketing content. And when it’s well-reasoned and time-tested, you can share your philosophy with clients or members of your team to support the choices you make.

If this is a new or strange concept for you, identifying your core principles may be tough, but don't feel like you need to adopt someone else's viewpoint. Your marketing philosophy should matter deeply to you. You should be able to defend it. Ideally, it'll come to you organically, after you've had enough first-hand exposure to both the good and bad practices of the industry or your specific craft. But you still may need to ask yourself the hard question, "What do I believe in?"

Write down your marketing philosophy. Then, share this blog post with the rest of your team and ask them to do the same type of thinking. Once they have, look for any commonalities in your philosophies. Where do you align? Can your company actively focus on those mutual principles to maximize their impact?

Then, how might harnessing the power of your shared beliefs affect your company culture and morale, your hiring practices, even the customer experience you deliver?

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What You Can Learn from Norm Macdonald? 
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Monday, 04 April 2022 18:50

Winning

MadAveGroup CEO Jerry Brown opened the 2022 Toledo ADDY Awards ceremony with this message.

If you believe that participation trophies are dangerous, if you think the term “hero” gets tossed around a little too easily these days, if you believe in pushing forward regardless of the obstacles you face, you may identify with Jerry’s take on “Winning.”

 

Monday, 21 March 2022 20:35

Imagine This!

Paper Animal Sculptures at the Pemberville Library

These wonderful animals live in the Pemberville, Ohio Public Library. They're the work of Laurel Rakas, the Coordinator of Children's Services there since 1996.

"We get boxes of books that are padded with this wrinkly, brown paper," she wrote. "We used to throw the paper out, which drove me crazy. I always wanted to do something with it."

So, she did.

"In 2020, our summer reading program theme was 'Imagine Your Story.' I thought, I can look at this packing paper and imagine it as something else. Then, we asked other libraries in our system for their paper and, boy, did we get a response! We were inundated with paper!"

As the raw material came in, her menagerie grew. And the reaction from visitors was immediately positive. "People have been very complimentary. I love to hear the response from children who have never been in before. They're full of wonder. It's been very gratifying."

Laurel is not paid to create art, but she seized an opportunity to make something out of nothing because it was important to her.

As a result, she's made her workspace a more interesting place to be.

Her paper creatures have surprised and delighted countless Library visitors.

She's led by example, quietly encouraging kids to stretch their imaginations and look for possibilities, even when they might not be readily obvious.

Laurel may have even inspired her co-workers to undertake their own art projects or learn new skills.

And down the road, who knows? Her creations may attract more good P.R. from area newspapers and via social media. She might even be able to auction off her animals for the benefit of the Library.

What if your company followed Laurel's lead?

How might the freedom to create or take on passion projects impact your culture? Your employees' engagement? Their loyalty?

What if they could experience the pride Laurel takes in her paper sculptures? What if they could generate that same type of positivity? In other words, what if you prioritized finding different ways to help your people shine?

Imagine that.

By the way, Laurel's project is ongoing. "This year's reading program theme is 'Oceans of Possibilities.' I'll be building some sea creatures and I'm planning a kelp forest that will hang from the lights."

RELATED POSTS: Ready to be Inspired?
Choose to See the Opportunity
For New Results, Change Your Perspective 

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