The Mad Ave Blog

The Mad Ave Blog (284)

On June 13th, 2017, the 120-year-old Wachter Building next to our UpTown Toledo offices was destroyed by fire.

As news of the fire spread, people from neighboring buildings poured into an adjacent parking lot to watch firefighters attack the blaze.

And as many of those people pulled out their cell phones to capture images or video of the scene, I noticed something: they all stood in one spot - far from what was happening - and shot what had to be merely an “overview” of the action.

This was hardly an everyday occurrence: a three-alarm fire was engulfing an historic structure. There were a dozen fire trucks and 70 firefighters onsite; motion; intensity; the sound of sirens in the air; thick, black smoke everywhere; a collapsing building.

And all most people saw - and recorded - was one perspective.

As a contrast, take a look at the video above. It was shot from every side of the burning building. Long, cover shots mixed with tighter views. Pans and tilts, cuts and crossfades. Quick visual side stories of the people fighting the fire, their trucks and equipment.

The Point

Your company’s story is not one-sided. To tell a more interesting version of that story, you have to be willing to look at it from all possible angles. The big picture and the details. The obvious and the unexpected.

Separating your company or product begins with your curiosity about what else is possible. So poke around. Ask questions. And then, tell your brand’s story by compiling insightful “shots” one at a time, giving your customers a unique look into your world.

Remember - from the parking lot, everyone’s view of the fire was the same.

Flour Sack DressesThe photo on the left was taken in 1939 and appeared in Life Magazine.

I saw it in June of 2015, and it has stuck with me ever since.

The online caption read, "After realizing that poor women were using flour sacks to make clothing for their children, some flour mills started using flowered fabric for their sacks."

Man, I love that.

So simple, yet so powerful.

It’s an example of a company relating to their customers’ needs - needs, by the way, that had nothing to do with the flour mills’ actual product - and then making an adjustment to help.

It’s a sweet story of people getting creative to make life a little better for others.

We’ve covered that idea several times in this blog:

If you want to differentiate your brand, stop thinking about it as differentiating your brand - for at least the time being - and start doing something extra that matters to your customers, your community, you and your team.

Make it real. Make it human and heartfelt. Make that adjustment, and then make a difference.

GraduationI went to my son’s high school graduation yesterday. It was a ceremony filled with many moving moments, and, as I reflect on it today, a few marketing lessons.

1) Be an inspiration. Just like a great commencement speaker, your marketing and advertising should inspire your audience.

That might mean providing them with reasons to follow and engage with your brand, or showing how you’re leading by example to improve your corner of the world. Paint a vivid picture of what’s possible with your products, services, philosophy or team.

2) Share stories. Graduation season is a time for reflection. That often means revisiting memories and telling stories about teachers, friends and all the good times.

The stories you share in your marketing content will give your audience a better feel for your company’s personality and what it’s like to work with you. Stories are also easier to remember and relate to than cold, hard facts. Check out a few of our stories here, here and here.  

3) Celebrate. Sure, give your team a big shout-out on your website or social media for their latest award or accomplishment. Just make sure to tie the message back to your audience.

Why should they care about your good news? How can they apply the details to their own needs? How does the information make the decision to buy from you easier?

4) Be yourself. Graduates wear long, shiny robes, along with oddly shaped hats, cords, sashes and medals. In other words, stuff they’d never be caught dead in normally.

That's all part of the pomp and tradition of graduation, but ask yourself if your marketing accurately presents your culture and who you are, or are you “dressing it up” for the public?

5) Dream. New graduates often dream about the future: their next steps, pursuing their goals and passions, making a difference.

When’s the last time you put your feet up on the desk and dreamed about what you could be doing with your marketing? How much more effective - and fun - could it be? What are some of the other metrics you’d like to pursue? What will your marketing legacy be?

Let us know if you’d like any help making those dreams come true.

That Time Amazon Saved a WeddingBrad Timofeev, our Director of Digital Marketing, is getting married to Lauren this Saturday (May 27th).

“Earlier today,” he wrote to me, “I had an unbelievable experience with Amazon.”

There’s a 90% chance that Brad and Lauren’s outdoor wedding is going to include rain. Lots and lots of rain.

With no real indoor option, “Lauren was in pure breakdown mode this morning. It looks like everything she had envisioned for her wedding isn’t going to happen. She’s never broken down like this before.”

Brad told me the rest of the story.

“I felt awful for her, and I tried scrambling for churches, but after about two hours, we decided to embrace the day for what it’s going to be: wet.

"So I needed to find 30 or 40 clear umbrellas in a few hours and get them here in two days. My first thought was Amazon because I know their shipping times are always reliable.

"After I ordered the umbrellas, I immediately called Amazon to confirm that the order was accurate and that the shipment would arrive by Friday.

"First off, the hold time was only about 10 seconds, which was a huge shock because, of course, Amazon is one of the biggest companies in the world.

"Then, John answered the phone. He said all the umbrellas were in stock and that he’d make sure they got out the door today for delivery by Thursday afternoon - a full day sooner than I expected. I ended up getting emotional on the phone because I was so thankful to him. After the craziness of the morning and seeing how distraught Lauren was, I just couldn’t keep my feelings bottled up any longer.

"The fact that someone cared that much about a complete stranger and understood our situation was so nice. It felt like everything was going wrong, especially for Lauren. But John’s help and his reassurance reminded me that people still care. It was an unbelievably positive experience that I didn’t expect.”

Brad’s story is a good reminder that your customers may come to you with important needs, urgency, and a complete lack of time, all with plenty of emotional trauma mixed in.

When you handle those situations with care and compassion, you not only make life easier for your customers, you can make customers for life.

Congratulations Brad and Lauren. We love you. 

Personal AttentionMany years ago, my wife Amy began her own tradition: she started sending cards to her friends and relatives just before Thanksgiving.

These are not early Christmas cards. In fact, the cards she buys never depict any type of holiday image or include a pre-written message.

Instead, she uses blank cards and writes a personal note to each of her loved ones, reinforcing how much they mean to her and how thankful she is to have them in her life.

A few days after the cards are sent, the phone starts ringing. Friends and family from around the country call to thank her for her thoughts and kind words.

These are people with kids and jobs and big holiday dinners to prepare, and yet, they stop what they’re doing to reply to a simple card with a 30-minute phone call.

Neither Amy nor I can recall a single response to the hundreds of Christmas cards we’ve sent over the years, so why do so many people respond to her “Thanksgiving” cards?

First, the timing. The cards are unexpected. They’re sent a good couple of weeks before the Christmas season really kicks in, so the recipients aren’t actively looking for a card the way they might on December 20th. In other words, her card is a nice surprise.

Secondly, everyone sends cards for Christmas, but because hers arrive so much earlier, they’re not “competing” for the recipient’s attention; their timing helps them stand out and contributes to their special quality.

Finally, it’s the nature of her cards. They’re not stamped with her signature. They’re not mass produced. Each one is hand-written. Personal. Genuine. They’re the kind of cards people save. And in sending them, she’s not looking for something in return. She’s simply reaching out to strengthen her relationships with the people who are important to her. Not hundreds of people. Just a few dozen.

So, are your 25 or 50 best clients worth a little more personal attention?

Is their long-term loyalty to you worth the time it takes to dream up new and valuable ways you can impact their lives and jobs? And not for what that may mean to you, but what it can do for them? 

Do they deserve more face-to-face visits?

How are you letting them know that you're thinking about them and their needs throughout the year?

Are your sales and marketing efforts born of a genuine interest in helping your clients?

Just a few questions to ponder as you consider your company’s marketing efforts.

Advertising is an OpportunityUsually, advertising takes.

Pre-roll videos, radio and TV spots, print ads: they all interrupt or delay what people want to see or hear. So, by their very nature, those types of advertising take.

They take the audience's time. They take their attention. They can even take the momentum and enjoyment out of the entertainment experience.

But what if advertising were used to give?

Here’s an example.

About 97% of people are not in the market for a new vehicle at any given time. And because Americans own their cars for an average of 6.5 years, most drivers won't be looking for new wheels anytime soon.

Yet, radio and TV commercial breaks are filled with car dealer spots, sometimes back-to-back. And so often, the “take-oriented” message in those commercials is about price or specific vehicles - information that will no longer apply when the majority of the audience is actively shopping for a new car.

So, what if a car dealer were to use his advertising to provide unbiased advice on purchasing a new vehicle?

Or tips on how to keep your current vehicle running its best?

Or the six steps to maintaining your car’s paint job?

Or a few facts that would help you choose the right engine oil?

Or suggestions for cool weekend road trips?

Or specific examples of how buying an American-made model benefits you and your community?

Or stories of how the dealership has gone above and beyond to care for their customers over the years?

Oh, and, by the way, “please think of us when you need a new car.”

What if that car dealer used his air time and ad space to focus on you, rather than himself and his products? To give you valuable information? To prove to you over and over again that his company is worthy of your trust? To build - in a way - a relationship with you?

Not only would you come away from that advertising a smarter consumer, you might develop a fondness for the company responsible for it.

As a marketer, you can't change the interruptive nature of certain channels, but you can change your content - from self-focused to audience-focused; from taking to giving, with the goal of creating a valuable, long-term role in the lives of your audience.

RELATED POSTS: Four Keys to Great Advertising
Why You Should Re-Think Your Radio and TV Spots
Don't Make People Hide from Your Advertising

United Airlines LessonOn April 9th, 2017, security officers representing United Airlines dragged a screaming 69-year-old passenger out of his seat and off a United plane, creating an indelible image of customer abuse and a public relations nightmare that could haunt the brand for years.

But four United employees needed those seats more than a few paying customers.

But the screaming passenger is a convicted felon.

But the fine print on the ticket gives the airline the right to remove anyone from the plane.

So what?

We live in a time in which everyone has instant access to a video camera and potentially a worldwide audience. Regardless of how those involved try to rationalize their actions, manhandling a customer should have never even been close to a solution.

On the United website, the company's Customer Commitment states that their goal “is to make every flight a positive experience” for their customers, that they provide “a high level of performance,” and that they're dedicated to delivering the type of service that makes them “a leader in the airline industry.” 

United employs nearly 88,000 people around the world, so maybe it's unfair to expect that every one of their employees would live up to that portion of their brand promise. But how many people work for your company? Do they all know what you promise your customers, whether it's online or implied?

Are they empowered to make decisions that serve your customers and protect your brand image?

Do you remind them that the world is watching, even if your “world” is just a few hundred customers?

Make sure your employees know what your brand stands for, what's expected of them, and what will never be tolerated.

BBC Dad Robert Kelly Interview

Probably 20 years ago, I was at our town’s art museum watching a friend play music in one of the galleries. About half way through the set, my friend’s four-year-old son emerged from the crowd and walked up to him on the improvised stage.

What happened next has stuck with me all the years since.

My friend - interrupted while doing his job, in front of an audience - stopped what he was doing and gave his full, genuine attention to his young son.

No anger. No frustration or embarrassment. No hurriedly rushing the little boy back to his seat. Just pure love on display.

My friend knew what was important. And still does.

Contrast that warm memory with what we saw from Professor Robert Kelly and his wife after their children innocently walked in on their father’s live BBC interview in March of 2017. (Watch the video here.) 

The embarrassment. The apologies. His attempts to blindly push away his daughter. The mother’s frantic floor crawling.

Sure, an episode like that might throw anyone off his game a bit, especially if being interviewed on live TV. But because of the way both parents reacted, they kinda’ came off as jerks. And, purely from a marketing standpoint, how may that have affected Kelly’s personal brand and likability?

Goofy, unpredictable stuff like that happens now and then. About the only way you can prepare for it is by reminding yourself to be a human being, to roll with it, and to always look for the humor in unexpected situations. You should have heard the heartfelt “awwww” coming from the crowd when my friend reacted the way he did to his little boy.

For both you personally and your company, letting your human side show and embracing life’s wackier moments is likely only to endear you to your audience.

RELATED POSTS: What Can You Learn from a Coal Miner's Daughter?
Are You Too Chicken to Stay True to Your Values? 
Lighten Up! Customers Will Like You For It (BusinessVoice)

Using TestimonialsThe most effective type of advertising is word-of-mouth advertising.

A friend tells you about the great experience she had at a new restaurant. A family member raves about how well he was treated at a local car dealer.

Why are you likely to put more stock in what they say than what you hear in TV or radio commercials for the same businesses?

Simple: your friends and relatives have nothing to gain by promoting a product or company. They’re impartial, and they only want to share some good news with you.

When you and other members of your team actively encourage testimonials and then incorporate them into your marketing content, you’ll tap into the persuasive power of happy customers.

Their words will resonate more with other customers and prospects because their words aren't self-serving. Their words often come in the form of unsolicited thank you notes or appreciative email messages, so, just like a recommendation from a friend, their sincerity is above reproach.

We can use testimonials on your website, as social media posts, in your On Hold Marketing and other channels as social proof of the claims we make on your behalf. The consistent truths we see in your testimonials may even help us decide which claims to make.

I urge you to make collecting testimonials part of your company culture. A few ideas:

1) When customers tell you how much they enjoy working with you, ask them if they'd be willing to express their thoughts in an email. Or if a customer compliments you while on the phone, jot down her quote and ask for permission to use it as a testimonial.

2) Whenever possible, include the customer's full name, title and company when displaying the testimonial.

3) Save each testimonial as a Word doc with a file name that includes a keyword or phrase that the customer references. That makes it easier to find testimonials about specific topics when you want to show them to prospects.

4) Consider keeping testimonial letters, cards and emails in a binder that visiting prospects can read.

5) To encourage staff members to collect testimonials, harness their competitive spirit: read the best examples during your company meetings or share them with your staff via email, making sure to credit the employee who received the praise.

6) You might also give a gift card or other reward to the team member who receives the “most valuable” or "most unlikely" testimonial each month.

Wednesday, 01 March 2017 08:45

Growing Customer Share

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Account PenetrationMany years ago when I lived in another town, I used to visit a farm stand during the summer months.

The lady who ran the stand didn't have nearly the selection of the local grocery store, and her produce was even a bit more expensive than the store's.

But she knew my name. And she used it every time she saw me.

She was friendly. She put an extra apple in my bag now and then. And every time I left the stand, she sent me off with a warm "thank you" and an invitation to come back soon.

I didn’t get any of that from the grocery store.

Yes, the store was fancier and air conditioned, but I never walked out with the sense that I had just been cared for.

The lady at the farm stand quickly earned my loyalty by making me feel important, showing her appreciation for my business, and giving me added value.

Can you see how that approach could go a long way toward helping you win and keep customers?

It’s much easier, less expensive and more profitable to sell ten different products to one happy, loyal person than to sell one product to ten relatively disengaged people.

So, consider making account penetration a higher priority: increase your share of each customer, rather than increasing your share of the market.

Meeting that goal requires strengthening relationships with your most important customers; learning their wants, needs, pains and goals, and actively looking for opportunities to care for them.

When you take a legitimate interest in helping your customers succeed, when you serve more as a consultant and less as a vendor looking for a quick sale, when you truly work on behalf of your customers’ interests, you’ll earn the type of loyalty that's necessary for deeper relationships to prosper.

Partner with your best customers. Find ways to get more involved with their businesses, and let them into yours. Develop ways you can work together for the betterment of both companies. As a partner that delivers real value, you become much harder to shake when cheaper competitors move into the market.

Finally, the customer whose business consistently nets your company a million dollars per year is more valuable to you than the customer who spends a couple thousand dollars once in a while, so why treat those two customers equally?

That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t apply the basics of good service to every customer, but committing the same resources to the smaller client can't possibly yield the same return.

And if your employees believe there is no difference between customers, they’ll have no incentive to provide preferential treatment to those who deserve it.

However you choose to measure their importance to you, your more valuable customers should receive an even higher degree of service. After all, they pay for it every day with their loyalty to you.

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